Programs of Study

Programs of Study

I. General.

Scope. – This policy establishes the regulations for all education programs that are designed to prepare students for the 21st century by improving the quality of teaching and learning in the public schools and ensuring that equal education opportunities exist for all students, including, but not limited to rigorous high quality 21st century curriculum, engaging instructional strategies, experiential learning programs, support programs, personnel, instructional materials, supplies, equipment, technology integration, and facilities.

II. Purpose.

A. The Pocahontas County education program shall provide the necessary resources, including technology, to ensure that students attain high standards of performance.
At early levels, students will achieve proficiency in the basic skills of reading, writing, mathematics, 21st century learning skills and technology tools. Achievement of these skills will provide the foundation for later intellectual challenges in all programs of study. Students will explore their interests and abilities and engage in relevant activities to help them understand the world of work. Technology will be a tool to help achieve these standards in all schools.

B. Schools, in cooperation with the Pocahontas County Board of Education, will determine their individual approaches, pursuant to this policy, to assist students in achieving high levels of performance in the adopted 21st Century Content Standards and Objectives and 21st Century Learning Skills and Technology Tools. Appropriate accountability measures will ensure that students and educators achieve high levels of performance.

III. Scope.

A. The major purposes of this policy are to improve the quality of learning and teaching in the public schools and to ensure that equal education opportunities are provided to all public school students. Equal education opportunities to achieve one’s potential include, but are not limited to comparably high quality programs of study, including experiential learning opportunities; student support programs; personnel; facilities; instructional materials; supplies; equipment; technology integration; and effective instructional practices. Given the demands of the global marketplace, it is essential that all students become lifelong learners prepared for successful entry into post-secondary education or the 21st century workplace.

1. Education Goals. (W. Va. Code §18-1-4). Through the combined efforts of the government, the school system and the people, the West Virginia Education Goals set forth in W. Va. Code §18 1 4 will be achieved.

a. All students shall master or exceed grade level educational standards that reflect 21st century skills.

b. All students shall receive a seamless pre-kindergarten (hereinafter pre-k) through twenty curriculum designed and delivered with broad stakeholder involvement to promote lifelong learning in a global society.

c. All students and school personnel shall develop and promote responsibility, citizenship, strong character and healthful living.

d. All students shall be educated in school systems that operate and deliver services efficiently and effectively.

e. All students shall be educated by highly qualified personnel.

2. Ensuring a quality education implies that a thorough and efficient education system exists that provides equal access to substantive curricular offerings and appropriate related services for all students. Providing such an education system must be the goal of the WVBE, West Virginia Legislature (hereinafter Legislature), West Virginia Department of Education (hereinafter WVDE), Regional Education Service Agencies (hereinafter RESAs), county board of education, and the people of West Virginia. This policy provides the basic structure for all education programs and student support services necessary for a thorough and efficient system of education to be available to all students. The elements of a thorough and efficient system of education are:

a. high quality education programs, student services and experiential learning opportunities;

b. high quality administrative and instructional practices, personnel, facilities, instructional materials, technology integration, supplies and equipment;

c. a safe and caring environment that fosters supportive relationships, is free from harassment, intimidation, bullying, discrimination and other inappropriate forms of conduct, and that involves parents;

d. a demanding curriculum for all students, with emphasis on the core academic programs of study that are aligned with rigorous standards for 21st century content, learning skills and technology tools and are communicated to students, parents and communities; and

e. accountability measures to ensure the public that a thorough and efficient system of education is being provided to students enrolled in the public schools of West Virginia.

3. System Requirements – The system of education shall provide opportunity for every child to develop literacy skills; proficiency in 21st century learning skills and technology tools; the ability to perform mathematical functions; the ability to make informed choices among persons and issues that affect his or her governance; the
ability to assess self and the total environment to know options and choose life

work; the ability to perform in the world of work and post secondary education; the ability to live a healthy lifestyle; the ability to participate in recreational activities; an understanding of the creative arts; and a sense of responsibility to facilitate compatibility with others in society and with other cultures.

IV. Responsibility of County Board of Education. It is the responsibility of each the county board of education to plan, deliver and evaluate the education programs and student support services necessary to implement a thorough and efficient system of public education. The programs of study and student support services mandated by regulations must be made available to all students. In carrying out this responsibility, a county board of education may: 1) cooperate with one or more counties in establishing and maintaining joint programs, 2) use regional services or contract for services with public or private agencies having appropriate programs, and 3) coordinate and share programs, related services and resources with other organizations, agencies and local businesses. Regardless of the method chosen, each county board of education shall: 1) collaborate with local business and community groups through establishment of partnerships and a county steering committee; 2) be responsible for developing and implementing a five-year strategic plan that results in systemic change in the areas of organizational culture, curriculum, instruction, school effectiveness and student support through a continuous improvement process, based on the Framework for High Performing 21st Century School Systems (See W. Va. 126CSR43, WVBE Policy 2470, Use of Technology by Students and Educators (hereinafter Policy 2470); and W. Va. 126CSR48, WVBE Policy 2450, Distance Learning and the West Virginia Virtual School; 3) distributing the county board’s resources as determined by the plan; and 4) be accountable to the public through the annual West Virginia Report Card.

V. Program Definition

A. The education program offered in West Virginia schools is defined in broad terms as all of the education activities that take place during the school day and the school year. The education program provides education opportunities for students to achieve high levels of learning in core subjects, 21st century content and 21st century learning skills and technology tools that prepare students to be lifelong learners and successful citizens in a competitive global digital society. The education program is based upon the best information available regarding effective practices and information that is provided through scientifically based research so that the program of education is efficient and effective. The education program is structured and based on four programmatic levels: early childhood education, middle level education, adolescent education, and adult education. Each county board of education shall establish policies and implement written procedures to define its education program in accordance with the definitions and requirements that follow.

1. Early Childhood Education (Grades Pre-k-4). Programs for children in early childhood shall address the holistic needs of the child and be based on the child’s developmental level. Cognitive, social/emotional and physical development need to be addressed as inter-related
areas of development. The focus for cognitive development is the acquisition of reading,
English language arts and math skills. Skill building, technology utilization and learning for young children require teachers to be knowledgeable about child development and skilled

in providing classrooms and instruction that meet children’s needs. For grades pre-k-3, informal assessments, as well as formal assessments, will be used to guide daily instruction. Appropriate assessments improve the quality of classroom instruction by being responsive to individual student’s needs.

a. Pre-kindergarten (Pre-K). West Virginia’s pre-k is a readiness program designed to build the skills children need to be successful in kindergarten and as a foundation for lifelong learning. Research supports the need for a balance of teacher-directed and child-initiated instruction. The pre-k classroom should have the time, space and materials necessary to create effective environments for learning and implementation of their chosen approved curricular framework. Teachers in pre-k must be purposeful in planning and providing classrooms where learning occurs in the context of active exploration and hands-on discovery. In West Virginia’s pre-k program, the emphasis is on cognitive, social/emotional and motor development. These areas are inter-related and interdependent and cannot be addressed in isolation. Knowing the developmental sequence of skill acquisition is fundamental for providing high quality pre-k classrooms.
Learning activities shall be simultaneously provided for children at different stages of development. Experiencing the world is a young child’s work, thus the classroom environment is a key factor in the provision of high quality learning experiences for young children. Classrooms should be designed and equipped in a manner that supports discovery, small group and individual learning, exploration, problem solving and development.

i. Pre-kindergarten (Pre-K) Programs of Study

Chart I: Pre-kindergarten (Pre-k)
Children in Pre-k will have daily opportunities for problem solving, critical thinking and active engagement in the given content areas.
Language and Literacy
Mathematics
Science
Physical Health
The Arts
Social Studies
Social/Emotional Development

ii. The acquisition of oral language and literacy skills shall be a primary focus. Pre-k
classrooms must provide print rich and language rich environments. Learning centers that support the chosen approved curricular framework are required for all pre-k classrooms including preschool special needs. These learning centers are to be intentionally designed to support learning and the development of critical thinking
skills. Daily instruction in pre-k shall be individualized, based on informal and formal
assessments, and address the West Virginia pre-k content standards and objectives
(W. Va. 126CSR44O, WVBE Policy 2520.15, West Virginia Early Learning Standards Framework, Content Standards and Learning Criteria for West Virginia Pre-Kindergarten (WV Pre-k). Teachers shall utilize a variety of teaching strategies, including the integration of technology.

b. Primary Elementary (K-2). The focus for K-2 is building strong reading, English language arts, and math skills. Learning environments shall be print rich, language rich and provide manipulatives for hands-on learning in reading and mathematics. Children in kindergarten through 2nd grade span a broad spectrum of development. The developmental level of each child is significant in the offering of daily instruction. Teachers shall utilize a variety of teaching strategies, including the integration of technology, to assure that all children are mastering the 21st century content knowledge and skills.

i. Primary Elementary (K-2) Programs of Study

Chart II: Primary Elementary (K-2)
In K-2 classrooms, the given content areas are taught daily in a manner in which students are actively engaged in learning through whole group, small group and learning center activities. Sufficient emphasis must be placed on the given content areas to ensure that students master content knowledge and skills as specified in the 21st century content standards and objectives for each subject. Reading and English Language Arts
Mathematics
In K-2 classrooms, not less than 30 minutes of physical education, including physical exercise and age appropriate physical activities, for not less than three days a week shall be provided. Schools which do not currently have the number of certified physical education teachers or required physical setting may develop alternate programs that will enable current staff and physical settings to be used to meet the physical education requirements. The alternate programs shall be submitted to the WVDE and the Healthy Lifestyle Council for approval. Physical Education

All content areas may be integrated but must be taught in an inquiry-based, hands-on, experiential manner. Specific instruction in the given content areas may or may not be offered daily. Sufficient emphasis must be placed on the given content areas to ensure that students master content knowledge and skills as specified in the 21st century content standards and objectives for each subject. Science
Social Studies
Visual Art
Music
Health
Learning Skills and
Technology Tools

ii. Instruction in K-2 classrooms will be individualized and driven by informal and formal assessments to help children attain the performance level of mastery or above as delineated in the approved West Virginia content standards and objectives. Strategies for early detection and intervention to correct student deficiencies in reading, language arts, and mathematics shall be employed throughout the instructional term in each of the primary elementary and intermediate elementary grades.

iii. Components of career awareness and the application of technology shall be included during instruction in all subjects. The study of foreign language is encouraged. Students in k-2 classrooms shall be provided the opportunity to master the standards set forth in W. Va. 126CSR44N Policy 2520.14, 21st Century Learning Skills and Technology Tools Content Standards and Objectives for West Virginia Schools (hereinafter Policy 2520.14).

2. Intermediate Elementary (3-4). Children in intermediate elementary may be developmentally ready for instruction that is content area focused. This does not preclude the use of integrated instruction. Intermediate elementary students are beginning the transition into middle childhood. An emphasis on the developmental level of these intermediate elementary students must be a continued consideration.

a. Intermediate Elementary (3-4) Programs of Study.

Chart III: Intermediate Elementary (3-4)
Intermediate elementary students will be taught the given content areas through whole group, small group and learning center activities as a block or throughout the school day. Sufficient emphasis must be placed on the given content areas to ensure that students master content knowledge and skills as specified in the 21st century content standards and objectives for each subject. Reading and English Language Arts
Mathematics
Science
Social Studies
Intermediate elementary students shall be provided not less than 30 minutes of physical education, including physical exercise and age appropriate physical activities, for not less than three days a week. Schools which do not currently have the number of certified physical education teachers or required physical setting may develop alternate programs that will enable current staff and physical settings to be used to meet the physical education requirements. The alternate programs shall be submitted to the WVDE and the Healthy Lifestyle Council for approval. Physical Education

These given content areas will be offered with frequency sufficient to achieve mastery of the West Virginia approved content standards and objectives for those areas and meet the needs of children. Visual Art
Music
Health
Learning Skills and
Technology Tools

i. For intermediate elementary students, daily classroom instruction will be based on a variety of assessments that provide for the individualization of instruction. Schedules for intermediate elementary students shall allow the flexibility necessary to provide additional time and instruction for students who are below mastery in reading, English language arts, and mathematics.

Teachers in intermediate elementary classrooms shall utilize a variety of instructional strategies, including the integration of technology, to assure that all students reach the performance level of mastery or above on the West Virginia content standards and objectives. Strategies for early detection and intervention to correct student deficiencies in reading, language arts, and mathematics shall be employed throughout the instructional term in each of the primary elementary and intermediate elementary grades.

ii. Components of career awareness and the application of technology shall be
included during instruction in all subjects. The study of foreign language is
encouraged. Students in intermediate elementary classrooms shall be provided
the opportunity to master the standards set forth in Policy 2520.14.

3. Middle Level Education (Grades 5-8). Middle level education builds upon the results of early childhood education and transitions students into the adolescent education program. Middle level education provides unique, age-appropriate educational opportunities that challenge all students to use their minds well, providing them with the curriculum, instruction, assessment, support, learning skills, technology tools and time they need to achieve rigorous academic standards. Students are provided opportunities for both independent inquiry and learning in cooperation with others. Middle level programming is challenging and engaging, tapping the young adolescents’ boundless energy, interests and curiosity through rich exploratory experiences. Students learn to understand important concepts, develop essential skills and apply what they learn to real-world problems. The creation of small learning communities of adults and students produce stable and mutually respectful relationships that support all students’ intellectual, ethical and social growth.

a. Middle Level Education (Grades 5-8) Programs of Study
Chart IV: Middle Level Education (Grades 5-8)
These required core courses shall be taught daily by a team of qualified teachers. An intervention component will ensure mastery of the rigorous content standards and objectives at each grade level. The principal and a team of teachers will determine time allocations that provide adequate time to achieve mastery of the West Virginia content standards and objectives for each of the required courses and effectively address the academic needs of students who are below mastery in the basic skills of reading, writing and mathematics. It is recommended that all students planning to enter the high school professional pathway will be enrolled in Algebra I in the 8th grade. Reading and English Language Arts
Mathematics/Algebra I
Science
Social Studies
Students in middle grades shall be provided not less than one full period of physical education, including physical exercise and age appropriate physical activities, each school day of one semester of the school year. Schools which do not currently have the number of certified physical education teachers or required physical setting may develop alternate programs that will enable current staff and physical settings to be used to meet the physical education requirements. The alternate programs shall be submitted to the WVDE and the Healthy Lifestyle Council for approval. Physical Education

These required courses shall be taught as separate subjects. Students shall be enrolled in each course for a minimum of 18 weeks cumulative across grades 6-8. Visual Art
Music1
Health2
Foreign language shall be offered annually. Foreign Language3
These requirements shall be integrated into the middle level education as determined by the principal and the team of teachers. Advisory/Comprehensive School Guidance and Counseling
Career Exploration4
Technology5

1Choral and instrumental music must be offered no later than grade 6. Chorus or instrumental music may substitute for the required music course at each grade level.

2Middle grades schools should recognize that healthy lifestyles and academic success are tightly interwoven. Therefore, schools should promote wellness programs that extend beyond the course requirements for physical education and health. This may be accomplished through strong intramural programs that focus on skill development, sportsmanship and teamwork, while
keeping the middle grades students physically active throughout the school year. Wellness programming should target the widespread behaviors that undermine the health and resulting capacity for personal success during adolescence. In accordance with W. Va. Code §18-2-9, instruction in CPR and First Aid shall be included in the health education curriculum in any of the grades six through eight as considered appropriate by the county board of education.

3The teaching of foreign language in grades 5 and 6 is encouraged. A foreign language course, in the same foreign language, must be offered for students in grade 7 and grade 8. Implementation of the foreign language program should model best practice and promote positive proficiency outcomes.

4Students in grades 5-8 should be provided with an adult advocate, advisor, or mentor who takes an interest in the student’s successful learning, goal setting, career planning and personal growth. It is strongly recommended that schools implement an organized advisory program. Implementation of an advisory program allows schools to remove the randomness of interpersonal associations for students by personalizing their learning environment. The test scores and guidance information gathered by the American College Test (hereinafter ACT) EXPLORE, as well as other assessment data, will be used to assist 8th grade students in developing an individualized student transition plan. With guidance during well-planned activities, second semester 8th grade students, in consultation with their parents/guardian, advisor

and counselor, will examine their EXPLORE results and determine the coursework and other requirements needed to achieve their postsecondary education and career goals. This is best accomplished by integrating these activities into an organized advisory program.

5Students in grades 5-8 shall be provided the opportunities within the core courses to master the standards set forth in Policy 2520.14, Technology Content Standards and Objectives for West Virginia Schools. Students must be provided sufficient instruction and experience in technology applications to enable them by the end of 8th grade to demonstrate technology literacy and skills to meet the standards in grades k-8 set forth in Policy 2520.14.

b. An Individualized Student Transition Plan (hereinafter ISTP) covering grades 9-12 and the first year beyond graduation from high school is developed for every student in consultation with her/his parents/guardian and school counselor or advisor.

i. During the 8th grade year, each student’s ISTP plan is developed for grades 9 and 10. The ISTP is based upon previous career awareness, exploration activities, and a review of the student’s ACT EXPLORE results. The 8th grade guidance/advisement program will focus on teaching students and their parents to read the ACT EXPLORE student reports so that they may understand how to use the information provided within the Educational Planning and Assessment System (hereinafter EPAS) reports to transition to the level of performance required to meet the student’s educational goals.

ii. Each student, in consultation with his or her parents/guardian and school counselor or advisor, selects a broad career cluster of interest for exploration in grades nine and ten and develops the ISTP based upon their choice of a tentative high school educational pathway. The student shall designate an educational pathway (professional or skilled) at this time. The student may amend his/her ISTP at the end of any semester.

iii. For an eligible gifted student, a four-year education plan is developed during the 8th grade year by an IEP Team. The four-year education plan replaces the ISTP and includes the honors College Board Advanced Placement® (hereinafter AP®) and/or International Baccalaureate (hereinafter IB) classes that must be provided for the student in grades 9-12.

iv. For eligible students with disabilities the ISTP is developed during the 8th grade by an IEP Team.

v. The parent(s)/guardian and student each sign and receive a copy of the ISTP.

vi. Students in the skilled pathway will designate a career concentration by the end of their 10th grade year.

vii. The ISTP must be reviewed annually with the student and his/her parent or guardian.

4. Adolescent Education (Grades 9-12). Adolescent education provides students the 21st century intellectual, social/emotional, physical and technological capacities needed for successful entry into adulthood. The adolescent education program provides challenging and rigorous courses in the programs of study that will enable students to achieve high levels of competence so they can complete graduation requirements and be prepared to successfully enter and compete in the workplace and in post-secondary education. Students in the adolescent education program will have the opportunity to examine a system of career clusters and to annually review their educational pathway and chosen career concentration.

Chart V outlines the West Virginia high school graduation requirements effective for all students enrolled in high school in the 2011-12 school year, unless otherwise specified.

Chart V Adolescent (9-12) Graduation Requirements (Effective 2011-12)
These graduation requirements are effective for all students enrolled in school year 2011-12 and thereafter. Courses needed for graduation require mastery of approved 21st century content standards and objectives. Students who do not demonstrate mastery of the content standards and objectives shall be provided extra help and extra time through intervention strategies.
Core Requirements (18 credits)
Reading and English Language Arts 4 credits
English 9
English 10 or an AP® English course
English 11 or an AP® English course
English 12 or an AP® English course
Mathematics1 4 credits
From the approved mathematics course sequences1
Science2
3 credits
Physical Science
Biology or Conceptual Biology or AP® Biology
One additional rigorous lab science course2
Social Studies3 4 credits
World Studies to 1900
United States Studies to 1900
Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries Studies
Grades 9-11 may substitute the following AP®
Courses: AP®World History, AP®US History, AP® European Studies, or AP® Human Geography, Civics for the 21st Century or AP® Government and Politics
Physical Education 1 credit
Health 1 credit
The Arts5 1 credit
Electives 2 credits
The remaining graduation requirements are to be electives.
Science – 4th credit from the list of approved science courses2

Foreign Language – 2 credits in one language

1 additional credit required. It is recommended that all professional pathway students complete at least one AP® course with corresponding examination. 4 additional credits required for completion of the students’ selected concentration (ISTP)

Career Development
All students in grades 9-12 shall be provided structured, on-going experiences for career exploration, decision making and career preparation.
Experiential Learning
All students must participate in an experiential learning experience at some time in grades 9-12. If credit is granted for these experiences, content standards and objectives will be developed and approved at the local level. (See Section 5.6.5)
Technology Students in grades 9-12 shall be provided integrated opportunities within the core requirements to master the standards for Policy 2520.14. It is recommended that all students take at least one course in technology applications during grades 9-12. It is also recommended that all students complete an online learning experience during grade 9-12. Students must be provided opportunities for advanced technology applications.
Senior Year All West Virginia high school students shall be fully enrolled in a full day of high school and/or college credit bearing courses. It is recommended that students complete a senior project to add rigor and relevance to the senior year.

1. It is the intent that all students in the professional pathways will take mathematics annually, but
must take at least three mathematics classes in grades 9-12. The recommended course sequence, which may include college courses, AP® courses, IB courses, or virtual school courses, for students in
the professional pathway is Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Trigonometry, and Pre-Calculus. The recommended course sequence in the skilled pathway is Algebra I, Geometry, Conceptual Mathematics, and Transition Mathematics for Seniors or Algebra II. Transition Mathematics for Seniors must be offered annually and will be counted as a mathematics credit. Students in the professional pathway and college bound students in the skilled pathway, who do not achieve the state assessment college and career Readiness Benchmark (CCRB) for mathematics, may be required to take the Transition Mathematics for Seniors course their twelfth grade year. Consideration will be given to mathematics performance on previous assessments and completion of mathematics courses to allow students who do not meet the CCRB to have other mathematics course options. Students who take the Transition Mathematics for Seniors course will take an end-of-course assessment to provide timely feedback on their readiness for college and career. The end-of-course examination will align with the WVHEPC’s Series 21 Freshmen Readiness Assessment and Placement Standards.

Because of the extreme importance of mastery of the Algebra I content standards and objectives (CSOs), students who need additional time to master Algebra I CSOs may be identified at the local level using a data-based decision making process. Students who need additional time for Algebra I CSO mastery
should complete the recommended math course sequence at a pace that is consistent with their ability levels. While research indicates the best option for scheduling additional time is to do so within the same year, scheduling options such as “double blocking” Algebra I, Algebra Support and Algebra I, or other similar options may be determined at the local level, as long as the priority of the selected option is to provide students the best possible opportunity to succeed in mastery of the Algebra I CSOs. Counties selecting a scheduling option that places students who need extra time into two separate
math courses may grant students up to two math credits toward graduation upon successful course completion. Therefore, the mathematics course sequence for these students will be Algebra Support,

Algebra, Geometry and Conceptual Mathematics. It is further recommended that students who are in the most need of continuous math instruction be enrolled in at least one math course each year in high school.

2. Physical Science and Biology or Conceptual Biology shall be taken in consecutive order. However, conceptual credits may not be accepted by four-year higher education institutions for admission. Any
lab-based science course above Biology and listed in Policy 2520.35 including science courses will meet the requirements for the third and fourth science credits.

3. Students shall take the high school social studies courses in the listed sequence to ensure maximum understanding of the material to be covered and alignment of the content and State Assessment. World
Studies to 1900, United States Studies to 1900, Twenty-First Century Studies and Civics for the 21st Century shall be taken in consecutive order. When substituting AP® courses students should take AP® World History and AP® US History courses in place of two of their required courses. Students may substitute AP® European History or AP® Human Geography as a third required course in grades 9-11. The senior course, Civics for the 21st Century, has been written to deliver rich academic content within relevant context for students entering the world of work and college; therefore, the only acceptable substitute for this course is AP® Government and Politics.

4. The four credits taken by career/technical concentrators must be consistent with those identified for WVDE approved career/technical programs of study. Each career/technical concentration in a school shall obtain and maintain an appropriate industry-recognized accreditation/certification, when one is available, and shall provide students the opportunity to obtain an industry recognized credential as part of the instructional program. For the Skilled Pathway other than career/technical education areas, schools must identify and have local board approval for each of their locally designed concentrations. The concentrations must have four sequenced courses aligned with a postsecondary career option.

5. Students in Skilled Pathway concentrations that complete state approved career/technical courses that reflect creative and innovative arts content may substitute these courses for The Arts credit required for graduation. Students who elect to substitute one of the listed CTE courses for the required art credit must enroll in an additional CTE course applicable to their selected CTE concentration.

The following courses are approved for substitution:

1851 – Fundamentals of Illustration
1857 – Fundamentals of Graphic Design
1861 – Advanced Illustration
1859 – Advanced Graphic Design
1982 – Ornamental Metalwork
1431 – Digital Imagining I
1727 – Drafting Techniques
0213 – Floriculture

Chart VI Adolescent (9-12) Electives (Effective 2011-2012)
Electives Required To Be Offered Optional Electives
Note: Any college or dual credit course offered in lieu of a graduation requirement must first receive a WVBE approved waiver before counting towards graduation.1 These courses must be offered at least in alternating years. (Effective 2004-2005)
These courses (or others) may be offered depending on need or student demand.
COLLEGE BOARD AP® COURSES
IB PROGRAM1 A minimum of four College Board AP® Courses (at least one from each core content areas of English/Language Arts, mathematics, science, and social studies) or the IB Program must be offered annually.

READING AND ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS Journalism/Newspaper/
Yearbook
Speech
Desk Top Publishing
English college courses
AP® English courses
Creative Writing
Library/Media
Technical Writing
Broadcast Journalism
MATHEMATICS Algebra II
Algebra III
Geometry or Applied
Geometry
Pre-Calculus
Trigonometry
Conceptual Mathematics
Transition Mathematics for Seniors2 Calculus
Probability and Statistics
Mathematics college courses
AP Mathematics courses
Algebra Support
SCIENCE Physics
Earth Science
Human Anatomy and Physiology
Chemistry Conceptual Physics
Science college courses
Biology II
Chemistry II
Physics II
AP Science courses
Environmental Science
Conceptual Chemistry
SOCIAL STUDIES Economics
Geography
Social Studies college courses
AP Social Studies courses
FOREIGN LANGUAGE Three levels of one foreign language Other foreign languages based on student need and interest
AP Foreign Language
Foreign Language college courses

HEALTH Any courses required to satisfy a concentration Other health courses based on student need and interest
Health college courses
PHYSICAL EDUCATION3 Any courses required to satisfy a concentration and one lifetime physical education course3 Other physical education courses based on student need and interest
Physical education college courses
THE ARTS Four sequential levels of student achievement in music (both choral and instrumental), visual art (general art and/or studio art), dance, theatre Other courses in the arts based on student need and interest
AP Arts Courses
Arts college courses
CONCENTRATIONS Four specified courses within each skilled pathway Other courses based on student need and interest
DRIVER EDUCATION One course Other driver education courses based on student need and interest
TECHNOLOGY
Information Technology
Information Management
Web Development
Other courses based on student need and interest
CAREER/TECHNICAL EDUCATION
Note: Schools must provide students access to concentrations in a minimum of four of the following career clusters:
° Arts and Humanities
° Business/Marketing
° Engineering/Technical
° Health Sciences
° Human Services
° Science/Natural Resources 80% of students in grades 9 10 must have access to at least one career-technical foundation course. One foundation course must be offered that teaches parenting skills Other career/technical education courses based on student need and interest
30% of students in grades 11 12 must have access to four units in a career/technical concentration and two career/technical electives
An additional 30% of students in grades 11-12 must have access to two units in a career/ technical concentration

1. Any approved AP® or IB course may substitute for a content related graduation requirement. Of the four required AP® courses to be offered annually, one must be in each of the four core areas of mathematics, Reading/English Language Arts, science and social studies. Students taking AP® courses are strongly encouraged to take the corresponding AP® examinations. All AP® courses must have a syllabus approved by the College Board.

2. Transition Mathematics for Seniors must be offered annually based on results of the State’s college readiness benchmark assessment.

3. Schools which do not currently have the number of certified physical education teachers or required physical setting may develop alternate programs that will enable current staff and physical settings to be used to meet the physical education requirements. The alternate programs shall be submitted to the WVDE and the Healthy Lifestyle Council for approval.

a. Grade 9-12 Attendance. The following rules shall govern student attendance in grades 9-12.

i. Attendance for the full school day for all four years during grades 9 12 is important so that students obtain the full benefit from the educational programs offered in the schools of West Virginia. Therefore, all students shall be scheduled in the defined high school curriculum, college courses, career/technical programs or virtual school courses for the full instructional day for all four years.

ii. The county board of education shall develop and implement a policy which shall be approved by the WVBE that defines the compelling circumstances under which students may attend school for fewer than four full years and/or may be scheduled for courses for less than the full instructional day.

VI. Programs of Study. The programs of study identified in Charts I-VI must be available to and be taken by all students as noted in the charts.

A. A student who transfers into a West Virginia school that has higher graduation requirements may not be able to complete these requirements. In such cases, the student’s credits shall be evaluated to determine if one or more county and/or state requirements will be waived by the county or state superintendent.

B. If a student has been enrolled continuously in grades 9-12, the student shall be expected to meet the graduation requirements that were in effect when he/she entered 9th grade (with the exception of the science requirement altered with the revision on May 2011).

C. If a student has enrolled after dropping out of school, the requirements that a student must meet depend upon the length of time he or she has been out of school. If the student has been out of school less than one year, he/she would be expected to complete the graduation requirements that were in effect when he/she entered grade 9 for the first time. If the student has been out of school one year or more, he/she would be expected to complete the graduation requirements in effect upon re-enrollment.

VIII. Individualized Student Transition Plan. Prior to the end of their 10th grade year, each student shall develop, after review of the student’s ACT PLAN results, and in consultation with her/his parent/guardian(s) and school counselor or advisor, the second phase of the ISTP. Each student in the skilled pathway shall select a high school concentration that will prepare the student for post-secondary education, and/or gainful employment. The ISTP may be amended and/or the concentration changed at the end of any semester.

A. Students may take one of the following in place of a course as listed in the applicable high school program of study: 1) a higher level course, 2) a more rigorous course, 3) a College Board AP® course, 4) an IB course, or 5) a college course. Parent/guardian approval must be evidenced by signature on the student’s ISTP.

1. A student, in consultation with his/her parent/guardian(s), may request to take a higher level or more rigorous course, The College Board’s AP® course, IB courses or college course in lieu of a required career concentration or recommended elective course as specified in the high school programs of studies document. Such requests should be approved by the county superintendent (or designee) and principal. The decision as to whether the substitute course will count as credit for the specified concentration or recommended elective requirement must be based on its applicability to the student’s 5 year transition plan and post high school goals. Schools shall provide information regarding the availability of advanced courses to students and parents and strongly encourage students to take such courses based upon the results of the ACT PLAN, student interest and post-secondary goals.

2. The student and his/her parent/guardian(s) must be advised of the decision of the superintendent (or designee) and the impact of the substitute course on the student’s preparation for college, other postsecondary education or employment in the student’s concentration.

3. A notation must be made on the student’s ISTP indicating that this process was followed and that the parent/guardian(s) and student clearly understand the impact of the course substitution.

B. The parent/guardian(s) and student each sign and receive a copy of the ISTP.

C. Other ISTP components may include the following:

1. Co-curricular activities

2. Extracurricular activities

D. Each graduate will be provided a form that assesses the effectiveness of his/her ISTP, and will be requested to complete and return the form at the end of the first year following graduation to the high school from which he/she graduated.

IX. Experiential Learning. The county and school shall require experiential learning experiences for each student at some time in grade 9, 10, 11 or 12. Each county board of education shall:

A. establish a procedure for coordinating experiential learning;

B. establish criteria for selecting quality experiential learning and sites;

C. establish criteria and standards that students must meet to be eligible for experiential learning;

D. establish standards and objectives for the different types of experiential learning;

E. establish process and criteria for experiential that merits the awarding of credit;

F. provide staff development for coordinators, mentors and supervisors of experiential learning; and

G. establish linkages to enable school personnel and businesses to provide experiential learning opportunities to support and enhance programs of study and career development.

X. Graduation Requirements. The state graduation requirements total 24 credits. See Charts V (A) through V (D) for specific credits required for graduation.

A. The courses needed for graduation, indicated in Charts V (A) through V (D) require mastery of the WVBE and county board of education approved content standards and objectives. The level of mastery shall be determined in compliance with Policy 2515 and with W. Va.
126CSR44A through 126CSR44O, WVBE Policies 2520.1 through 2520.17, 21st Century Content Standards and Objectives for West Virginia Schools (hereinafter CSOs).

B. If county board of education proposes to schedule class periods in a manner that results in fewer than 8100 minutes of instructional time allotted for a high school course credit, it must obtain a waiver from the WVBE prior to implementing such a schedule. Courses approved through the West Virginia Virtual School approval process may be exempt from this requirement. County and multi-county vocational centers may, in order to accommodate transportation times for students, schedule courses for credit with fewer than 8100 minutes of instructional time provided the center documents student mastery of the content standards for those courses.

C. The county board of education has the authority to increase these requirements for its schools. The county superintendent shall notify the WVDE of any changes in requirements beyond the state requirements.

D. The county board of education must ensure that students have access to at least four College Board AP® courses annually. All AP® courses must have a syllabus approved through the College Board. Effective 2012-13, all AP® courses shall be taught by a teacher who has completed the required professional development. Access to AP® courses may also be met via West Virginia Virtual School AP® courses. WVBE Policy 2515 requires that grades earned in an AP® course be weighted.

E. Additional courses not identified in Chart VI may be offered to afford students the opportunity to attain mastery of the content standards and objectives, to broaden and enrich their education, and to support academic and career development. Any elective offering must be based on WVBE approved content standards and objectives if available or based on written content standards and objectives that are approved by the county board of education.

XI. Alternative Means to Earn High School Credit. The county board of education shall provide alternative means for students to earn high school credit as explained below:

A. Any student who successfully completes a high school level course (one meeting the high school approved content standards and objectives and taught by a content certified teacher) prior to grade 9 shall receive full credit for that course toward graduation requirements. The student’s permanent record for grades 9-12 shall indicate completion of the courses. The grade for any course taken prior to grade 9 becomes part of the student’s permanent record and is calculated in the student’s grade point average (hereinafter GPA).

B. The county board of education shall adopt policies that allow students to earn credit for completion of college work. If these credits are to be used to meet graduation requirements, they must meet the requirements for a dual credit course.

C. The county may develop tests for the purpose of moving students more quickly through the curriculum by “testing out.”

D. The county boards of education shall adopt policies and programs that allow students to recover credit for failed high schools courses. Researched-based successful credit recovery programs require students to successfully demonstrate mastery of content rather than repeat an entire course.

E. All students will receive appropriate grades and/or credit for all work completed while attending school, regardless of the duration of their enrollment period.

XII. High School Diploma. The county boards of education shall award a high school diploma to every student who has completed the standard graduation requirements.

A. An eligible student with disabilities who has been determined by an IEP Team to be unable even with extended learning opportunities and significant instructional modifications to meet state and county standard graduation requirements may receive a modified diploma.

B. An institutional education program operated by the WVDE will transfer graduation credits to a county school district for the awarding of the high school diploma.

C. Beginning with school year 2008-2009, an eligible student with disabilities who meets the criteria for instruction based on modified standards may pursue either a standard or modified diploma. These decisions are specified on the student’s IEP.

XIII. High School Credential. Beginning with the graduating class of school year 2008-2009, the school system shall offer the following high school credentials for qualifying graduating students.

A. College Readiness Credential – Any student who scores at or above the college readiness benchmarks as defined by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission, shall receive a college readiness credential.

B. Work Readiness Credential – Any student who completes an approved career/technical concentration and obtains a passing score on ACT Workkeys assessments shall receive a work readiness credential.

XIV. Adult Education – Adult education is designed to meet the education, employment and training, economic, civic, cultural, social, and recreational needs of adults in the community served by public schools. These programs are offered by the county of education, community-based organizations or RESAs and are described in Chart VII. Chart VII identifies programs of study that provide lifelong learning opportunities for adults so that they may maintain, acquire, or enhance functional and/or technical literacy.

CHART VII: Adult Education Programs*

Adult Basic Education (ABE) Career and Technical Education Full- and Part-Time Classes Job Specific Services to Business and Industry
• Basic Literacy
• Basic Skills Assessment
• General Educational Development (GED) Preparation
• Distance Learning
• External Diploma Program (EDP)
• English as a Second Language (ESL)
• Institutional Education
• Family Literacy Programs
• Test Preparation for employment, college, military entrance exams
• Career Exploration Technical training is provided to assist adults seeking employment or enhancing their current employment.

• Industrial and Technical
• Computer Science
• Business Education
• Wood Products Technology
• Aqua Culture
• Hospitality
• Health Care • Workplace Education Programs
• Job/Task Analysis
• Training Material Development
• Training Video Production
• Technical Skill Training
• Supervisory Training
• Train-the-Trainer Program
• Customized Skills Development Classes
• Employee Assessment and Selection Service
• Use of Career/Technical Facilities/Equipment
• Referral to Other Agencies
Workforce Development Training for Special Populations Public Service Training
Academic skills and technical training are provided for economically and community development.
• Referral to Other Agencies
• Workplace Readiness
• Trade Readjustment Act
• Clean Air Act
• North American Free Trade Agreement • Emergency Medical Training
• Wastewater and Water Training
• Firefighting Training
• Hazardous Material Training

*To be delivered consistent with W. Va. 126CSR57, WVBE Policy 2420, Guidelines for Compliance with Adult Education Programs and Computation for Adults Enrolled Under the School Aid Formula, Adults in Net Enrollment .

XV. Alternative Delivery of Education Programs.

A. The county board of education shall establish policies and implement written procedures when providing for alternative delivery of education and service programs for students and community members. A thorough and efficient education must be available to all students, whether they are placed in regular or alternative programs.

B. Alternative Delivery Programs.

1. Extended student learning may be offered based on student needs and as funds and other resources become available.

a. Extended student learning may include, but is not limited to: extended day or year; mini-courses; summer school or an alternative calendar that allows for year-round schooling; and experiential learning that may take place outside of the regular school calendar. (See, e.g., W. Va. 126CSR73, WVBE Policy 3234, Year-Round Education Programs)

b. Extended student learning may be provided by the school system, community agencies, institutions of higher education, businesses or other entities under agreements authorized by the county board or WVBE. These agreements may include payment specifications for those parties using the facilities.

c. Students may elect to participate in extended learning opportunities and may receive elective credit when approved by the county board or WVBE.

2. All summer school programs shall be submitted to the WVBE for approval. Schools may award credits earned from approved summer schools provided the instructional program is equivalent to that required in the regular school term.

3. Community Education.

a. County boards of education should maximize opportunities to provide adult basic education or adult enrichment opportunities; and

b. Opportunities to provide continuing education and staff development for local businesses should be maximized. This includes training on appropriate placement and supervision of students participating in experiential learning.

4. Homebound/Hospital Services.

a. Students who, due to injury or for any other reason as certified in writing by a licensed physician or other licensed health care provider, are temporarily

confined to home or hospital for a period that has lasted or will last more than
three consecutive weeks shall receive home/hospital services. The written statement must include:

i. the specific reasons the student must remain at home or in the hospital; and

ii. the criteria or conditions under which the student can return to school, and the expected date of such return.

b. A written statement by a licensed physician or other licensed health care provider must be resubmitted every six months if a student’s temporary home/hospital instruction is prolonged.

c. The county board of education may require that the parent/guardian obtain an opinion from a second health care provider at the expense of the county board.

d. Home/hospital services must be designed to provide the student adequate opportunity to continue learning toward mastery of grade level content standards and objectives. The schedule for home/hospital services must include adequate instructional time and be provided at a location when a responsible adult in addition to the teacher is present.

e. Home/hospital teachers are responsible for facilitating instruction on the core courses’ content standards and objectives as guided by the student’s classroom teacher(s): consequently, the home/hospital teacher must be in regular contact with the classroom teacher(s) to

i. secure and understand units/lessons, instructional plans and instructional materials, and

ii. establish procedures for the collection and return of student work to the classroom teacher(s) for assessment.

f. Home/hospital services, provided for an exceptional student who is unable to attend school temporarily because of an injury, illness or health condition requires a change in the student’s placement to Out-of-School Environment (hereinafter OSE) as defined by W. Va. 125CSR16, WVBE Policy 2419, Regulations for the Education of Exceptional Students (hereinafter Policy 2419), Section 5.1.5.g.E. The change of placement to OSE must be addressed by the student’s IEP team and implemented in accordance with the requirements of Policy 2419.

g. Home/hospital services may also be provided temporarily at the direction of the county superintendent for students who have not met the immunization requirements of W. Va. Code §16-3-4.

5. Alternative Settings for Disruptive Students.

a. Students whose disruptive behavior places them at risk of not succeeding in the traditional school structure may be eligible for placement in an alternative education program as authorized by W. Va. 126CSR20, WVBE Policy 2418, Regulations for Alternative Education Programs for Disruptive Students (hereinafter Policy 2418).

6. West Virginia Virtual School Options.

a. With the appropriate approval, the West Virginia Virtual School may provide additional course options to be taken through distance learning that will support the alternative delivery settings described in Section 6.2.

7. West Virginia Option Pathway.

a. The Option Pathway is a blend of the Career Technical Education (CTE) Pathway and the General Educational Development (GED®) Tests. This pathway provides an opportunity for the high school students behind their ninth grade cohorts a second opportunity to graduate on time rather than dropping out of school.

C. Accountability for Alternative Programs.

1. All alternative delivery of programs for elementary and secondary schools must meet the standards and safeguards set forth in WVBE policies related to curriculum, instruction, and student support services.

2. Letters of agreement and/or contracts shall be used with external agencies, businesses and individuals to clarify responsibilities in areas such as student supervision, public access to school facilities, finance and program accountability.

XVI. County Board of Education Responsibilities.

A. The county board of education shall implement the following administrative practices.

1. Ensure that all schools are safe and that the environment is conducive to learning.

2. Implement the following rules governing student attendance in grades pre-k-12:

a. Ensure that all students, ages 6-16, are attending public schools or are exempted from compulsory public school attendance under the provisions of W. Va. Code §18-8-1.

b. The student attendance rate for elementary and middle schools is at or above ninety percent (90%) or the percentage of students meeting the attendance rate shows improvement from the preceding year. The student attendance rate will be

adjusted for the following allowable deductions as defined in W. Va. 126CSR81, WVBE Policy 4110, Attendance: absences that result from school-approved curricular/co-curricular activities; failure of the bus to run/hazardous conditions; excused student absences; students not in attendance due to disciplinary measures; and absent students for whom the attendance director has pursued judicial remedies to compel attendance (filed a criminal complaint or juvenile petition) due to provisions in W. Va. Code §18-8-4. For the adequate yearly progress (hereinafter
AYP) determination, the attendance rate calculation will be used for accountability at the public school, school district and state levels, but will not be calculated for each subgroup. However, for schools/school districts that use the safe harbor provision to meet AYP for the achievement indicators, the attendance rate standard must be met by the subgroup(s) not meeting AYP.

3. Provide assurances that the county comprehensive developmental guidance and counseling policy reflects provisions in W. Va. Code §18-5-18b.

4. Ensure that prior to the beginning of each school year, the principal and teachers at every school determine time allocations that, based on the needs of the students, maximize engaged instructional time and limit disruptions during the school day within the regular and alternative school calendars for specific instructional programs.

a. School calendars and schedules shall be organized to maximize academic learning time through a variety of strategies which may include, but are not limited to, restructuring the school day, providing tutorial sessions, utilizing appropriate technology, extending the school day and/or extending the school year.

b. The school calendar shall meet the requirement of W. Va. Code §18-5-45.

c. The school calendar shall provide, at a minimum, 12 hours per week for pre-k, and an instructional day of 315 minutes for kindergarten and grades 1-4, 330 minutes for grades 5-8, and 345 minutes for grades 9-12.

d. Accrued instructional time may not be used to avoid 180 separate days of instruction. For example, accrued instructional time may not be used to convert a complete day of instruction into a day to be used for some other purpose.

e. Co-curricular activities may, by their nature, be scheduled without regard to the use of accrued instructional time.

f. Accrued instructional time may be used by schools and counties to provide additional time for professional development that may include collaborative meeting time, time for training, and/or continuing education as may be needed to improve student performance and meet the requirements of the federal mandates affecting elementary and secondary education. The amount of accrued instructional time used for this purpose may not exceed three instructional days and shall be aligned with the school and county strategic plans.

5. Develop a Five-Year School System Strategic Plan.

6. Establish procedures at the county and school levels to ensure that informal and formal assessment data are used to identify student learning needs and to adjust instruction to meet those needs.

7. Provide a comprehensive system of career clusters and concentrations in order to ensure that students understand the breadth and scope of careers in the global digital workplace.

8. Develop a system for ensuring that instruction is based upon approved 21st century standards for content, learning skills and technology tools.

9. Appoint and maintain a county school system or multi-county technical center advisory council that meets on a regular basis to provide advice on current and future employment needs and on the relevancy of courses being offered. Each technical concentration must have a program area advisory council that meets on a regular basis to advise on course content, including which skills should be taught, instructional materials and equipment needed, and standards which should be met to assure student employability or preparedness for further education.

10. Appoint and maintain a county steering committee that includes parents and representatives from business, labor, higher education, economic development, local school improvement councils (one member from each programmatic level, pre-k-4, 5-8, 9-12), faculty senates (one teacher from each programmatic level, pre k-4, 5-8, 9-12), students (one from each programmatic level 5-8 and 9-12) and other organizational entities in the community.

a. The county steering committee will act as a partner with the county board in developing and implementing high quality preparation of youth for college, other post-secondary education and gainful employment;

b. The membership or designated representatives may serve, to the extent appropriate, on the community technical college district consortia committee as established in W. Va. Code §18B-3-3a;

c. The committee may also advise the county board of education in developing the County Five-Year Strategic Plan; and

d. The committee may also act as the Council on Productive and Safe Schools if it meets the stipulations for membership outlined in W. Va. Code §18-5-42.

B. The county board of education shall ensure that each school has established and is implementing:

1. A process to maintain a safe climate conducive to learning that enhances the physical, social, and emotional well being of students;

2. A process for flexible scheduling of students and staff to ensure that every student has the opportunity to achieve or exceed mastery of each content standard;

3. A process and procedures for providing quality, content-specific, scientifically based professional development to ensure implementation of methodologies and best practices for strengthening the rigor, content and relevance of the learning process;

4. Approved West Virginia standards for 21st century learning so all teachers are aware of the instruction students receive prior to entering the grade level they teach and what the expectations are for students to be able to succeed at subsequent grade levels;

5. A process for ensuring that instructional practices are based on scientific research.

6. A system for monitoring and assessing pupil performance related to the 21st century content standards and objectives of the school education program;

7. A policy for student homework;

8. A policy for grading that is consistent with WVBE Policy 2515 and that addresses, at least, the issues of retention, promotion and the replacement of a grade if a course is retaken;

9. A procedure for monitoring continuing record of student progress for student, parent and teacher information;

10. A process to ensure that parents are involved in the school and their child’s education;

11. A student code of conduct policy that requires public schools to respond immediately and consistently to incidents of harassment, intimidation, bullying, substance abuse and/or violence or other student code of conduct violations in a manner that effectively deters future incidents and affirms respect for individuals as outlined in W. Va. 126CSR99, WVBE Policy 4373, Student Code of Conduct;

12. A system to monitor dropout rates and, when appropriate, plans to reduce the student dropout rate;

13. A process for timely, accurate and complete entering of data into the West Virginia Education Information Systems (hereinafter WVEIS);

14. Library/media services that provide access to electronic means for retrieving, receiving and using information as well as traditional print resources.

15. Technology practices that facilitate student development in areas such as, but not limited to, computer skills, critical thinking and decision-making, application of academic knowledge in workplace programs, making informed career decisions and meeting the 21st requirements of WVBE Policy 2520.14;

16. A technology infrastructure that has multiple applications in enabling students to achieve at higher academic levels;

17. A school technology team that functions with the school strategic planning committee to develop a comprehensive technology plan that includes the West Virginia standards for 21st century learning as a component of the Five-Year School Strategic Plan. (See WVBE Policy 2470);

18. A Local School Improvement Council (hereinafter LSIC) as outlined in W. Va. Code §18 5A 2 that facilitates improvement of educational quality by encouraging the involvement of the school community in the operation of the school and by utilizing the waiver process when appropriate; (Note: The LSIC must conduct an annual meeting to engage parents, students, school employees and other interested parties in a positive and interactive dialogue regarding effective discipline policies; develop and deliver a report to the countywide council on productive and safe schools and examine their school’s discipline and report to the county superintendent on the following; disciplinary measures at the school; fairness and consistency of disciplinary actions at the school. If the LSIC believes that discipline is not enforced fairly or consistently, it shall report that to the Superintendent in writing with supporting documentation. The County Superintendent has ten days from receipt of this written report to respond to the LSIC.

19. A faculty senate that facilitates school improvement through practices outlined in W. Va. Code §18-5A-5;

a. Each county board of education shall, as provided in W. Va. Code §18-5A-5(b)(12), provide to each faculty senate either a two-hour block of time for a faculty senate meeting on a day scheduled for the opening of school prior to the beginning of the instructional term, and a two-hour block of time on each instructional support and enhancement day scheduled by the board.

b. Accrued instructional time may not be used to lengthen the time provided in law for faculty senates.

20. A school curriculum team that establishes instructional programs and methods, based on the needs of the school, that implement the state approved content standards, objectives and performance descriptors;

21. One instructional day in each of the months of October, December, February, April and June which is an instructional support and enhancement day scheduled by the county board of education to include both instructional activities for students and professional activities for teachers to improve student instruction as referenced in W. Va. Code §18-5-45(d);

22. A continuous system of program assessment, accreditation and program improvement; and

23. A Five-Year School Strategic Plan that is based on the identified needs of the students and is developed collaboratively by the LSIC, the principal, faculty senate, school technology team, school curriculum team and other appropriate stakeholders.

C. The county board of education must provide student services to ensure that students are able to participate in and benefit from a high quality education program. These services include, but are not limited to: guidance and counseling, health services, school psychological services, special education and related services, social services and attendance, transportation services, and nutrition services.

1. English as a Second Language services, or specially designed instruction, at no cost to parents, to meet the unique educational needs of an eligible limited English proficient student, including sheltered instruction conducted in the classroom and in other settings, shall be provided as specified in the student’s Limited English Proficient (hereinafter LEP) program of study and in accordance with W. Va. 126CSR15, WVBE Policy 2417, Programs of Study for Limited English Proficient Students.

2. Guidance and Counseling. School counselors work with individual students and groups of students through developmental, preventive and remedial guidance and counseling programs to meet academic, social, emotional, and physical needs; including programs to identify and address the problems of potential school dropouts. The school counselor also may provide consultant services for parents, teachers and administrators and may use outside referral services, when appropriate, if no additional cost is incurred by the county board of education. The role of the school counselor is defined based on the “National Standards of School Counseling Programs” of the American School Counselor Association as required in W. Va. 126CSR67, WVBE Policy 2315, Comprehensive Developmental Guidance and Counseling. School counselors shall be full-time professional personnel, shall spend at least 75% of work time in direct counseling relationship with pupils, and shall devote no more than 25% of the work day to administrative activities: provided that such activities are related to guidance and counseling.

3. Breakfast and Lunch Programs. W. Va. Code §18-5-37 requires county boards of education to establish and operate a breakfast program under which a nutritious breakfast shall be made available to all students enrolled in the school in accordance with standards of the WVDE. In addition to the School Breakfast Program, the National School Lunch Program provides nutritious meals for all students who choose to participate in the program. All schools must serve meals that meet the dietary guidelines set forth by the United States Department of Agriculture.

4. School Health Services. School health services provide early identification of health problems and follow-up activities to facilitate and assure appropriate health/medical care as required in W. Va. Code §18-5-22. Emphasis is placed on preventive services and health education to reduce absenteeism and academic failure and promote lifelong health-enhancing behaviors.

5. School Psychological Services. School psychological services facilitate the interpersonal and academic development of all students and foster the social and emotional health of students. School psychologists assist teachers and other school personnel with assessment information, behavior intervention plans, safe schools information, test taking skills, and reduction of test anxiety.

6. Compulsory School Attendance. W. Va. Code §18-8-1a requires compulsory school attendance to begin with the school year in which the 6th birthday is reached prior to September one of such year or upon enrolling in a publicly supported kindergarten program and to continue to the 16th day or for as long as the student continues to be
enrolled in a school system after the 16th birthday. The county board of education must employ a full-time attendance director if the county has a net enrollment of more than four thousand pupils and at least a half-time director if net enrollment is less than 4,000.

7. Special Education Services. Special education services, or specially designed instruction, at no cost to parents, to meet the unique educational needs of an eligible exceptional student, including instruction conducted in the classroom, in the home, in hospitals and institutions, and in other settings shall be provided as specified in the student’s IEP and in accordance with WVBE Policy 2419. Related services include transportation and such developmental, corrective and other supportive services as are required to assist an eligible exceptional student to benefit from special education and shall be provided as specified on the student’s IEP. Specific related services are defined and described in WVBE Policy 2419 and W. Va. 126CSR25A, WVBE Policy 2422.7, Standards for Basic and Specialized Health Care Procedures.

8. Transportation. Each student who requires county board provided transportation shall have safe, efficient transportation to the extent necessary to assure the opportunity to participate in the county education program.

D. Personnel.

1. The county board of education shall employ supervisory/administrative staff who are professionally certified administrators who have met the requirements of training through the principals’ academy as identified in W. Va. Code §18A-3-2c.

2. Principals shall be provided continuous, high-quality, sustained professional development opportunities through a variety of means that increases the principal’s ability to be an instructional leader so that students can achieve high levels of performance in the West Virginia standards for 21st century learning.

3. The county board of education shall:

a. Employ highly qualified teachers to implement each program of study;

b. Ensure that professional staff members are working in the areas of endorsement specified on their certificates;

c. Ensure that teachers have a general knowledge of the West Virginia Standards for 21st Century Learning and the Frameworks for High Performing 21st Century Classrooms for all programmatic levels (pre-k-12) to promote program articulation;

d. Ensure that professional staff are provided continuous high-quality, sustained, and classroom-focused professional development that increases the knowledge and skills required to create conditions that result in students achieving high levels of performance in the West Virginia Standards for 21st Century Learning;

e. Ensure alternative education programs, as outlined in WVBE Policy 2418, provide for the participation of staff certified in the core content areas in the development of the academic curriculum and the assessment measures to determine mastery of content standards and objectives;

f. Ensure that mentors are provided for first year teachers and administrators, and teachers moving into assignments in a different endorsement area and/or programmatic level;

g. Ensure that all teachers and library/media professionals are provided a duty free planning period that is the length of the usual class period and is not less than 30 minutes;

h. Ensure that all secondary teachers who teach College Board AP® courses have completed the required professional development. This professional development consists of: Advanced Placement® Summer Institute (APSI) delivered through the West Virginia Center for Professional Development (WVCPD) or other College Board endorsed APSI. Teachers of AP® courses must also (1) attend an APSI once every three years after completing the initial APSI and (2) attend an AP® fall workshop every two years (effective 2012-2013);

i. Ensure that all high school principals attend a WVCPD College Board endorsed AP® related workshop once every two years (effective 2012-2013);

j. Ensure that all AP coordinators attend an AP Coordinator’s workshop annually (effective 2012-2013).

4. The county board of education shall:

a. Employ aides to enhance the instructional environment and provide time to ensure educational quality in the classroom;

i. Aides assist teachers with non-instructional duties and in instructional related activities in appropriate programs. Duties may include, but are not limited to: a) clerical and technical assistance; b) in-class assistance; c) tutorial services; d) distribution of instructional materials; e) supervision of students in the instructional environment and during specific assigned duties (W. Va. Code §18A-5-8); f) assistance with technology utilization; and g) in some cases, performance of basic or specialized health care procedures.

ii. One aide is assigned to a pre-k or kindergarten class if the class enrollment exceeds 10 students.

iii. Aides are available for eligible students with disabilities as needed to implement the IEP and as set forth in WVBE Policy 2419.

iv. Aides assigned to a school are scheduled by the principal.

b. Use community resources, when appropriate, in innovative ways on a volunteer, part-time or contractual basis in order to complement, support or extend the instructional program including the provision of experiential learning opportunities.

5. The county board of education shall:

a. Implement an employee evaluation system based on W. Va. 126CSR142, WVBE Policy 5310, Performance Evaluation of School Personnel.

b. Implement a comprehensive system of staff development that includes the implementation of 126CSR149, WVBE Policy 5500, County Professional Staff Development Councils as an integral part.

E. Facilities. The county board of education shall ensure that facilities meet the standards set forth in W. Va. 126CSR172, WVBE Policy 6200, Handbook on Planning School Facilities.

F. Instructional Materials, Supplies, and Equipment. The county board of education shall:

1. Ensure that the instructional materials used as the primary resource for instruction in required programs of study are on the most recent list of state adopted instructional materials or have been exempted by the WVBE through an approved waiver or through the West Virginia Virtual School course approval process.

2. Establish procedures to select instructional materials and supplemental resources that correlate with approved content standards, objectives and performance descriptors for each content area.

3. Ensure that appropriate instructional materials and equipment are available for the full instructional term, in good operating condition, and are sufficient for the size of the group to be served.

4. Ensure that a copy of the appropriate content standards, objectives and performance descriptors is provided to each teacher and ensure that the public has been provided information about and access to materials for review upon request.

5. To the extent practicable, and as funds and other resources are available, provide access to instructional technologies outside the normal school day for use by students (including those in adult education), teachers, parents and citizens.

G. Education Information System. The county and all schools shall participate in the WVEIS.

XVII. School Based Responsibilities.

A. Strong leadership by principals is necessary for good schools and higher levels of student achievement. The principal’s primary responsibility is instructional leadership and support within the school that creates a 21st century learning environment. The following qualities, proficiencies, and leadership skills are required of principals:

1. Demonstrate instructional leadership to enhance school effectiveness by improving instruction and improving student performance.

a. Develop flexible schedules to maximize opportunities to deliver instruction to groups of students or to individual students who may need additional assistance to master basic skills.

b. Observe teacher and student performance in the classroom and provide feedback and recommendations for improvement.

c. Limit interruptions to instruction.

d. Analyze and use performance data to improve student achievement.

e. Assist teachers in developing individual plans for instructional improvement.

2. Establish a school environment that is safe, drug-free and conducive to learning.

3. Provide purpose and direction for schools.

4. Demonstrate cognitive skills to gather, analyze, and synthesize information to reach goals.

5. Manage group behaviors to achieve consensus.

a. Schedule time to work with staff, school leadership team, faculty senate, curriculum team and local school improvement council to plan, organize, implement and evaluate the education programs.

b. Coordinate high quality, scientifically research-based professional development activities identified in cooperation with the building staff, faculty senate, internal school improvement team, curriculum team, technology team, local school improvement council and the County Professional Staff Development Council.

6. Enhance the quality of the school organization.

7. Organize and delegate to accomplish goals.

8. Communicate effectively.

9. Provide leadership in the implementation of WVBE Policy 2520.14.

B. School staff must implement classroom management that fosters an environment conducive to student success including:

1. Creating an atmosphere that is safe, secure, caring and orderly;

2. Setting high positive expectations for themselves and for all students;

3. Establishing and communicating class rules and school rules;

4. Engaging students successfully in meaningful age-appropriate instructional activities;

5. Being prepared and initiating instruction as soon as students arrive in the classroom;

6. Protecting instructional time by allowing minimal interruptions of instruction and limiting out-of-class activities;

7. Exhibiting professional behavior, as defined in the W. Va. 126CSR162, WVBE Policy 5902, Employee Code of Conduct, showing consideration and respect for individual differences, and guarding confidentiality of student information;

8. Teaching, expecting, and acknowledging responsible behavior including students being prepared for class and having appropriate materials (books, paper, and pencils) with them;

9. Employing character education strategies that are incorporated and integrated into the total school environment and curriculum; and

10. Modeling commitment to equity, fairness and diversity through their practices to all students.

C. Each teacher and each school must implement a system for delivering classroom instruction that is designed to increase student achievement and to prepare each student for success in post-secondary education and the global workplace. The system must align curriculum,
instruction and assessment. Instructional delivery must incorporate validated practices and strategies that are based on scientific research. In implementing an aligned system of instruction, teachers:

1. Set, maintain and communicate high expectations which are consistently and repeatedly communicated to all students through challenging and rigorous instruction;

2. Provide students and parents/guardians with strong and relevant rationales for learning new information to increase student ownership and motivation in the learning process;

3. Seek, where appropriate, student input in creating assignments, choosing content and setting goals for learning;

4. Involve students in developing guidelines and contingencies for conduct and performance;

5. Teach all state (or county) content standards and objectives and learning skills and technology tools standards and objectives in each grade level and for each subject;

6. Are aware of content standards, objectives and performance descriptors of the curriculum that precedes and follows the grade(s) they are teaching;

7. Integrate technology in the delivery of instruction in all content areas;

8. Develop and utilize written lesson plans that focus on the mastery of concepts identified in the content standards and objectives for each course;

9. Use instructional materials and technology resources correlated with content standards, objectives and performance descriptors;

10. Assist students in linking prior knowledge with new information and in connecting information across content areas;

11. Provide instruction that is organized, appropriately sequenced, links new information with prior knowledge, and emphasizes the most important information to be learned;

12. Provide students with opportunities to maximize learning by incorporating the use of tools (e.g., graphic organizers, manipulatives);

13. Provide opportunities to process new information through individual and/or collaborative activities (e.g., peer editing, creating projects and or products, generating ideas, presenting/performing aspects of newly acquired information) and to practice information in a variety of contexts and settings to promote fluency, generalization and maintenance;

14. Provide opportunities for students to look at, reflect on, speak and write about the content;

15. Provide adequate opportunities for guided practice until students acquire fluency in performing the skill(s);

16. Enable students to solve problems and think critically by guiding them through the process to become independent learners;

17. Instruct students on how to learn task-specific strategies and how to model key behaviors required for learning a set of information or a specific skill;

18. Provide opportunities for students who have mastered the CSOs to move to the next level of instruction;

19. Differentiate instruction to meet individual student needs;

20. Assess student learning frequently through multiple formats and in various modalities (e.g., oral and written venues) and adjust instruction accordingly;

21. In grades k-3, use the content standards, objectives and performance descriptors in reading and mathematics and the accompanying state informal assessments to guide and measure student progress in these content areas;

22. Give positive, corrective and elaborated feedback to individual students in a timely manner and allow students opportunities to practice corrections;

23. Provide intervention and expanded learning opportunities based on a variety of student performance data;

24. Recognize student effort and celebrate progress in attaining learning goals;

25. Communicate with parents on a regular basis regarding their child’s educational performance;

26. Link classroom instruction to the student’s future work and academic success by integrating and reinforcing the skills required in a career and the workplace.

D. Students who demonstrate mastery of the 21st century content standards and objectives must be provided opportunities to progress to the next level of instruction.

E. Students who do not demonstrate mastery of the 21st century content standards and objectives shall be provided intervention through extra help, multiple instructional strategies and extra time in the classroom and in other school settings, as other settings are appropriate.

F. Instruction and practice in writing is required to be taught to all students. Teachers are required to establish expectations for written work in each subject area and to require that writing is a routine part of all classes. Schools provide teachers with resources, technical assistance and professional development in understanding the writing process and in grading students’ written work.

G. Multicultural education is required to be taught to all students at all programmatic levels, pre-k-4, 5-8, and 9-12. Schools/school systems are required to develop and implement a program for multicultural education.

H. Technology must play a major role in the delivery of all programs of study. Technology will be used as part of the delivery process for instruction and providing information for students. The use of technology, particularly computers, will also be a part of the curriculum so that students develop the skills and knowledge to use technology as an effective tool for learning, processing information and communicating information to others.

I. Student Assistance Team. Each public school shall establish a student assistance team that:

1. Consists of at least three persons, including a school administrator or designee, who shall serve as the chairperson, a current teacher(s) and other appropriate professional staff.

2. Reviews individual student needs that have persisted despite being addressed by instruction and intervention teams, or acts in lieu of an instruction and intervention team, and considers referrals for multi-disciplinary evaluation.

3. Invites parents to review recommendations made by the team in regard to the child’s program and to provide feedback to the team about those recommendations.

4. Is trained in referral procedures for multidisciplinary evaluations, Alternative Education placements, disciplinary procedures, and other school processes as appropriate for ensuring student progress and maintenance of a safe school environment.

5. Collects and maintains data on the activities of the team, including the dates of meetings, the members in attendance, the recommendations of the team, the dates of review meetings, and the results of its recommendations.

J. Schools must implement, in an equitable manner, co-curricular and extracurricular programs, at the appropriate instructional levels, that contribute to the success of students.

1. Co-curricular activities may take place during the instructional day.

2. Extracurricular activities shall occur outside of the instructional day.

XVIII. Statewide Assessment Program.

A. All public school students shall participate in the West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress (hereinafter WV-MAP).

1. All public school students enrolled in grades 3-11 shall be assessed at the grade level in which they are enrolled by the WESTEST 2 (grades 3-11) or the APTA (grades 3-8 and 11) in the spring of each year in the content areas of mathematics, reading/language arts and social studies. For the content area of science, all public school students enrolled in
grades 3-10 shall be assessed at the grade level in which they are enrolled by the WESTEST 2 (grades 3-10) or the APTA (grades 3-8 and 10) in the spring of each year. Students in grade 11 who are not enrolled in chemistry will not be assessed by the WESTEST 2 grade 11 science assessment. See W. Va. 126CSR14, WVBE Policy 2340, West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress (hereinafter WVBE Policy 2340), Section 4.2.

2. As stated in WVBE Policy 2340, section 3.53.1, the WESTEST 2 Online Writing is a session of the WESTEST 2 Reading/Language Arts (RLA) test. Thus, students enrolled in grades 3-11 shall be assessed at the grade level in which they are enrolled by the WESTEST 2 (grades 3-11). Student performance on the online writing session is combined with student performance on the multiple choice sessions of WESTEST 2 RLA to obtain an overall scale score and performance level for reading/language arts.

3. All public school students enrolled in the 8th grade, except those participating in the West Virginia Alternate Performance Task Assessment to WESTEST 2, shall participate in the ACT EXPLORE assessment with accommodations and/or with modifications as determined by their respective IEP Teams, Section 504 Committees, or LEP Committees in the fall of each year.

4. All public school students enrolled in 10th grade, except those participating in the West Virginia Alternate Performance Task Assessment to WESTEST 2, shall participate in the ACT PLAN assessment with accommodations and/or with modifications as determined by their respective IEP Teams, Section 504 Committees, or LEP Committees in the fall of each year.

5. All public school students enrolled in grades 4 and 8 who are part of National Assessment of Educational Progress (hereinafter NAEP) state sample shall participate in the NAEP, a component of the WV-MAP. The participant(s) of this test will be determined by a random sample at the national level. All students, except those participating in the West Virginia Alternate Performance Task Assessment component of WESTEST 2, will be placed on the school roster from which the random sample will be taken to determine NAEP participation.

6. WV-MAP shall be managed by a county test coordinator who has been provided training in administering the test instruments in this program.

a. Counties shall ensure that all school test coordinators and site administrators and/or designees, as well as all other appropriate central office and school building level professional staff, are adequately trained in test administration, interpretation and use.

b. Counties shall ensure that school test coordinators and site administrators and/or designees will provide adequate training and staff development for all educators that administer and/or proctor state assessments.

c. The county test coordinator in each county shall develop an outline or overview regarding the administration and use of the WV-MAP test results.

d. Practice tests, test improvement programs, juried lesson plans and technology may be used to improve student achievement.

7. All teachers shall be provided assessment data for the students in their schools and or classroom for the areas of instruction for which they are responsible in order to provide instructional intervention for students. Other professional staff in the school may access the test results by individuals, grade levels and/or groups of students for the purpose of instructional planning.

8. Any student performing below mastery on classroom assessments in reading/language arts or mathematics shall be provided intervention through extra help, multiple instructional strategies, and extra time in the classroom and in other school settings, as other settings are appropriate.

a. The county, school and teacher has a system for analyzing, interpreting and using student performance school or county data prior to the beginning of the school year. Data are to be used to identify and assist students who are not at or above mastery on the state approved content standards, objectives and performance descriptors.

XIX. School, County, RESA and Other Assessments.

A. The school, county, or RESA may develop assessments aligned with the CSOs and performance descriptors to drive instructional improvement for all students.

1. Assessments may include standard, non-standard, performance assessments or portfolios, observation performance data, achievement checklists, teacher made tests and other assessments that are at the direction of and use by the classroom teacher.

2. A system of diagnostic assessments to determine the performance levels is to be used in grades k-3, such as the WVDE informal reading and mathematics assessments or comparable assessments approved by the WVDE aligned to the content standards.

B. All public school students may be assessed with the appropriate end-of-course (hereinafter EOC) tests at the grade level in which they are enrolled and taking the course. All public school eligible students with disabilities under WVBE Policy 2419 or Section 504 will be assessed if necessary with the appropriate accommodations and/or with modifications as determined by their respective IEP Teams or Section 504 Committees or LEP Committees.

XX. Program Accountability.

A. The WVBE has adopted the following goals from NCLB to guide accountability for schools, county school districts and the state.

1. By 2013-2014, all students will reach high standards, at a minimum attaining mastery or better in reading and mathematics.

2. All LEP students will become proficient in English and reach high academic standards, at a minimum attaining mastery or better in reading/language arts and mathematics.

3. By 2005-06, all students will be taught by highly qualified teachers.

4. All students will be educated in learning environments that are safe, drug free, and conducive to learning.

5. All students will graduate from high school.

B. A single system of accountability is applied to all public schools and county school districts in West Virginia. See W. Va. 126CSR13, WVBE Policy 2320, A Process for Improving Education: Performance Based Accreditation System (hereinafter WVBE Policy 2320) for guidelines for the accountability system.

XXI. Program Improvement.

A. County Improvement.

1. Five-Year School System Strategic Plan. The county shall develop and implement a Five-Year School System Strategic Plan based on the Standards for High Quality Schools that contains at least the following:

a. Procedures and activities to strengthen the county education program in order to increase student achievement and positively impact other student outcomes.

b. 1) Core beliefs and mission, 2) data analysis, 3) improvement goals, 4) improvement objectives and benchmarks, 5) a work plan that includes action steps and professional development, 6) a system for monitoring and supporting the implementation and effectiveness of the work plan, 7) an evaluation process, 8) a budget and 9) annual planning updates for federal and state programs that meet the specific requirements of each program and support the goals and objectives of the plan.

2. County School Leadership Team. Each county school system shall have a County School Leadership Team which is responsible for supporting all county schools identified for improvement. The County School Leadership Team members are appointed by the county superintendent and may include distinguished teachers, distinguished principals, special education professionals, Title I professionals, WVDE professionals, RESA professionals, curriculum and instruction professionals, technology integration specialists and/or data analysis professionals. The County School Leadership Team may be the same membership as the School System Leadership Team, at the discretion of the county superintendent.

3. The County School Leadership team shall have the following responsibilities:

a. review all facets of the schools’ operations, including the design and operation of the instructional program, and make recommendations for improving student performance.

b. collaborate with the School Leadership Team, county staff, and the WVDE in the review of school improvement goals, development of the plan, and plan implementation.

c. continuously monitor the implementation of the school improvement plan.

d. make additional recommendations to the county and the WVDE concerning assistance that is needed by the school or the School Leadership Team.

B. School Improvement.

1. Five-Year School Strategic Plan. Every school must develop and implement a Five-Year School Strategic Plan designed to bring all students to mastery and beyond and to close the achievement gap, and adhere to the following criteria:

a. Prepared by the LSIC and other stakeholders as appropriate under the leadership of the school principal and in cooperation with the faculty senate, school technology team and school curriculum team.

b. Based upon: 1) Core beliefs and mission, 2) data analysis, 3)improvement goals, 4) improvement objectives and benchmarks, 5) a work plan that includes action steps and professional development, 6) a system for monitoring and supporting the implementation and effectiveness of activities, 7) an evaluation process, 8) annual planning updates for federal and state programs that meet the specific requirements of each program and support the goals and objectives of the Plan, and 9) a budget.

c. Predicated on the establishment of high expectations for performance of all students in the school.

d. Aligned with the Five-Year School System Strategic Plan of the school system.

e. Presented to the county board of education as part of the annual meeting between the LSIC and the county board of education.

2. School Leadership Team. Each school identified for improvement shall have a School Leadership Team. The members of the School Leadership Team may include the same membership as the team preparing the strategic plan as appointed by the principal, and may include representatives from the Curriculum Team, Faculty Senate, Technology Team, and/or the LSIC.

3. The School Leadership Team shall have the following responsibilities:

a. analyze all facets of the school’s operation, including the design and operation of the instructional program, which may include: all measures of students achievement, discipline, school climate, graduation rate, school survey results,

Office of Education Performance Audits review data, Title I monitoring results, special education monitoring results, technology integration issues, and master schedules.

b. make recommendations for improving student performance in the school.

c. collaborate with parents, school staff, county, and the County School Leadership Team in the identification of school improvement goals, school improvement plan development, plan implementation, and continuous plan monitoring.

d. make additional recommendations to the County Leadership Team concerning additional assistance that is needed by the school or the School Leadership Team as the school implements the plan.

e. collaborate with state system of support team to build capacity for improvement planning to address student learning needs.

4. Schools will be selected to receive technical assistance based upon their status with regard to the performance measures and high quality standards set forth in Policy 2320. The WVDE will operate a school improvement program the purpose of which is to build the capacity of county school systems to adequately support schools identified for improvement.

XXIII. Glossary.

A. Acceleration of Course or Grade Level – The process through which students can obtain mastery of content at a faster or earlier rate. Acceleration is available for all students who demonstrate academic readiness for various delivery options. Acceleration includes, but is not limited to, compacted classes/schedules, testing out, early school entrance, double promotion, early graduation, two or four year college or university enrollment, dual credit courses, “West Virginia Earn a Degree – Graduate Early” (hereinafter WV EDGE) courses, the College Board’s Advanced Placement® courses, and International Baccalaureate programs.

B. Accelerated Learning – Accelerated learning is the school-wide practice of using formative assessment data to identify struggling students early and once identified, provide these students with immediate assistance or extra help. Schools engaged in accelerated learning are schools with policy documents focused on academics, practices geared toward preparing students for college and the workplace, and teachers and administrators who consistently stress achievement and embrace rigorous standards. Teachers give more than one example and suggest more than one strategy to accomplish the learning goals. Through differentiation, these schools invite individual students to acquire process and demonstrate knowledge in ways different from the majority of the class if that is what is required for the student to become proficient and gain self-confidence.

C. Accrued Instruction Time – Instructional time accrued during the instructional term from time added to the instructional day beyond the time set forth in Section 13.54. Accrued instructional time may be accumulated and used in larger blocks of time during the school year for instructional or non-instructional activities.

D. Adolescent Education – The education program that addresses the intellectual, physical, social/emotional needs of students and prepares them for post-secondary education and the 21st century global workplace across all programs and areas of study in grades 9-12.

E. Adult Education – The education program that addresses the intellectual, physical, social/emotional and career development needs of persons 16 years of age and older who are not enrolled in public school.

F. Advanced Placement® – Advance Placement® courses are college-level courses offered in high school that provide students the opportunity to earn credit or advance standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.

G. Advisory Council – Groups of local employers and other designated stakeholders who provide advice to school districts, multi-county centers and technical program areas on issues relating to career and technical education, including current and future employment needs, standards, curriculum and equipment.

H. Area of Study – A logical subdivision of the subject matter contained within a program of study. For example, geometry and algebra are areas of study within the mathematics program of study.

I. The Arts – The programs of study for dance, music, theatre and visual art.

J. Career Awareness – The opportunity for students to learn about and develop an appreciation of the broad concepts related to work, careers and educational preparation.

K. Career Cluster – A broad grouping of related occupations representative of the types of occupations available in the world of work.

L. Career Development – The process through which a student comes to understand the world of work. Kindergarten through 4th grade focuses on career awareness; 5th grade through 8th grade focuses on career exploration; 9th and 10th grade focuses on career exploration and decision-making; and 11th grade through adult focuses on career preparation.

M. Career Exploration – The opportunity within the education program for students to conduct self-assessment, access career information, examine multiple career options and initiate education planning based on a tentative career focus.

N. Certificate of Proficiency – A certificate awarded in addition to the high school diploma, containing specific information regarding the graduate’s skills, competence, and readiness for further education and employment.

O. Character Education – An integrated and comprehensive approach to promote an understanding and inspire development of general character traits such as respect, responsibility, caring, citizenship, justice and fairness, and trustworthiness. Character education utilizes existing curricula, along with new and existing projects, programs and activities.

P. Class Period – A block of time provided for instruction in a course within a program of study.

Q. Classroom Management – The organization of the activities and environment of a classroom that are essential to teaching and learning.

R. Co-curricular Activities – Activities that are closely related to identifiable academic programs and/or areas of study that serve to complement academic and technical curricula.

S. College Course – Any course for which college credit is awarded (e.g., dual credit, WV EDGE credit, regular college course).

T. Comprehensive School Guidance and Counseling Curriculum – A curriculum component consisting of structured developmental lessons designed to assist students in achieving the competencies outlined in Policy 2315 which address academic, career and personal/social development systematically through classroom and group activities in grades pre-k-12.

U. Concentration – A series of courses directly related to a student’s chosen career cluster and postsecondary goal. The technical concentrations offered by the school must be aligned with local, state and national job market opportunities.

V. Content Standard – A broad description of knowledge and skills that students are expected to acquire in a content area.

W. Core Requirements – Reading and English language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, the arts, health, physical education, foreign languages, and concentrations.

X. County School Leadership Team B – A group of county school district representatives who are responsible for reviewing all facets of schools’ operations and making recommendations for improving student performance (especially in those schools that are identified in need of improvement). The county school leadership team members are appointed by the county superintendent and may include distinguished teachers, distinguished principals, special education professionals, Title I professionals, WVDE and RESA professionals, curriculum and instruction professionals, and/or data analysis professionals. These members may be part of the stakeholder group that develops and implements the Five-Year School System Strategic Plan.

Y. County Steering Committee – A committee that includes parents and representatives from business, labor, higher education, economic development, local school improvement councils (one member from each programmatic level, pre-k-4, 5-8, 9 12), faculty senates (one teacher from each programmatic level, pre-k-4, 5-8, 9-12), students (one from each programmatic level 5-8 and 9-12) and other organizational entities in the community. These members may be part of the stakeholder group that develops and implements the Five-Year School System Strategic Plan.

Z. Course – An area of study defined by approved content standards and objectives. Schools shall provide intervention through a variety of strategies that may include, but are not limited to, restructuring the school day, providing extra tutorial sessions, utilizing appropriate technology, enrolling in distance learning, extending the school day, and/or extending the school year.

AA. Curriculum – The content standards, objectives and performance descriptors for all required and elective content areas and 21st century learning skills and technology tools at each programmatic level.

AB. Diploma – Formal documentation and recognition that a student has satisfactorily completed the graduation requirements of the state and county school district. A Standard Diploma is awarded to all students who have satisfactorily completed the graduation requirements of the state and county school district. A Modified Diploma may be awarded to eligible students with disabilities.

AC. Dual Credit Course – A course that provides students both high school and college credit. Such a course must meet both the specified course content standards and objectives for secondary offerings and the college course requirements.

AD. Early Childhood Education – The education program that addresses the growth and development of young children using an integrated, developmentally appropriate approach as applicable to build the foundation knowledge in all curricular areas with an emphasis on the acquisition of skills in reading and mathematics. Early Childhood is divided into three subgroups: pre-k, primary elementary (k-2) and intermediate elementary (3-4). As children progress from pre-k to 4th grade, daily instruction should be designed to meet their changing educational and developmental needs.

AE. Education Program – A structure for defining, delivering, and being accountable for a thorough and efficient system of education. This structure is applicable at the state, county, and school levels.

AF. Elective Courses – Courses students may choose to study based on need and interest.

1. Required elective courses must be available to the student sometime during the appropriate programmatic level.

2. Optional elective courses may be made available by the county board of education, school or other entity based on student need and interest, but they are not required to be made available.

AG. Eligible Exceptional Students – Those individuals who, in accordance with the requirements of Policy 2419 have been determined to be: a) gifted (grades 1-8) or exceptional gifted (grades 9-12) and b) in need of specially designed instruction, and/or who meet the definition of Eligible Students with Disabilities.

AH. Eligible Limited English Proficient Students – Those individuals who, in accordance with the requirements of Policy 2417, have been determined to be LEP and in need of specially designed instruction.

AI. Eligible Students with Disabilities – Those individuals who have one or more of the disabilities defined in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act and Policy 2419 and who, by reason thereof, need special education and related services.

AJ. Eligible Students with Exceptionalities – Those individuals who are gifted or exceptional gifted as defined in Policy 2419:The Regulations for the Education of Exceptional and/or who meet the definition of eligible students with disabilities in this policy and Policy 2419 and who, by reason thereof, need special education and related services.

AK. Encore Courses (or Encore Curriculum) – Courses such as health, physical education, technical education and career awareness grouped as a block in middle school. These courses are also referred to as related arts.

AL. End of Course Tests – Assessments that measure student achievement in core career/technical courses. End of course tests are based on the 21st century CSOs for each course.

AM. Enrichment – Instruction that allows the student to study a subject more broadly or in greater depth.

AN. Experiential Learning – Structured quality work-based, services-based, community-based, and/or research-based learning experiences. These experiences require students to integrate knowledge and skills from academics, career/technical education, and/or the arts and demonstrate the personal qualities, skills, knowledge, and understandings they need to be leaders in the 21st century. Quality senior projects are one example of structured experiential learning.

AO. Extracurricular Time – Time that is not part of the required instructional day or curricular offerings but is under the supervision of the school. It may be used for athletics, non-instructional assemblies, social programs, entertainment and other similar activities. All rules and policies that apply to the instructional day also apply to extracurricular activities.

AP. E-Portal – A web site or service that provides a broad array of resources and services. The WVDE E-Portal may contain a test item bank, juried and other lesson plans, research and best practice information, links to other instructional sites and other instructional assistance.

AQ. Five-Year School Strategic Plan – A plan that specifies how the school intends to increase student achievement and positively impact other student outcomes. The plan must be developed and implemented using a continuous improvement process, be based on all available data regarding student achievement and align with the goals of the district Five-Year School Strategic Plan.

AR. Five-Year School System Strategic Plan – A plan that specifies how the county school system intends to strengthen the county education program in order to increase student achievement and positively impact other student outcomes. The plan must be developed and implementing through a continuous improvement process and designed to create graduates prepared for success in a digital global marketplace.

AS. Foundation Course – An elective course that enhances students’ skills or provides an introduction to further in-depth studies in a technical concentration. These courses are generally offered at the 9th or 10th grade levels. Examples include technology education,

family and consumer science, and business courses taken outside of a business-related major.

AT. Grade Level – The class structure that is used to organize and deliver education within West Virginia public schools. The public school education experience is divided into levels, pre -k through grade 12.

AU. Graduation Requirements – The number of required and elective units of credit that must be earned by a student in order to be graduated from high school. A diploma is the document that is awarded to a student to verify completion of these graduation requirements.

AV. High School Credential – Credentials which may be earned by graduating students. (See Section 5.6.11)

1. College Readiness Credential – Any student who scores at or above the college readiness benchmarks as defined by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission, shall receive a college readiness credential.

2. Work Readiness Credential – Any student who completes an approved career/technical concentration and obtains a passing score on ACT Workkeys® assessments shall receive a work readiness credential.

AW. Higher Level Course – A course in the same content area, but at a higher sequential level (e.g., Trigonometry in lieu of Geometry).

AX. Honors Courses or Programs – Courses or programs that expand the approved academic content standards and objectives in a given program of study and may include, but are not limited to, research and in-depth studies, mentorships, internships, content-focused seminars and extended instruction in a content area.

AY. Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Literacy – The ability to use technology to develop 21st century content, knowledge, and learning skills, in the support of 21st century teaching and learning.

AZ. Individualized Education Program (IEP) – A written statement for each eligible student with a disability or who is gifted (grades 1-8) and exceptional gifted (grades 9-12) that is developed, reviewed, and revised in accordance with Policy 2419.

BA. Industry Credential – A credential earned by students who complete an industry defined career/technical program of study and industry defined certification process.

BB. Instructional Day – Time allocated within the school day for the teaching and mastery of CSOs. The minimum instructional day for grades k 4 is 315 minutes, grades 5-8 is 330 minutes, and grades 9-12 is 345 minutes.

BC. Instructional Practices – The strategies, procedures, methods, techniques and behaviors used by teachers to help students attain mastery of the content standards and objectives of a content area.

BD. Instructional Term – The period of time from the opening of school to the closing of school. The specific dates for each county’s instructional term are set by the county board of education and must include a minimum 180 days of instruction. (W. Va. Code §18-5-45.)

BE. Integrated Mathematics – Mathematics courses that feature strands of algebra and function, geometry and trigonometry, statistics and probability, and discrete mathematics. These four strands are connected within units by fundamental ideas such as symmetry, recursion, function, data analysis and curve fitting. The strands are also connected by mathematical habits of mind (e.g., searching for and describing patterns, making and checking conjectures).

BF. International Baccalaureate Diploma Program (hereinafter IB) – A comprehensive two-year international curriculum designed for highly motivated secondary school students aged 16 19. IB is a rigorous pre-university course of study that leads to examinations. IB students generally receive college credit for successful completion of IB courses. The International Baccalaureate Organization has also designed programs for primary and middle school students.

BG. Intervention – Additional instruction and time, utilizing multiple strategies and assessments, to ensure student mastery of the content standards. The practice of removing students from any required course for intervention is discouraged.

BH. Juried Lesson Plans – Instructional units, normally web-based, covering any number of class periods, that have been aligned to content standards, reviewed by teachers, and shown to be effective based on actual use in the classroom.

BI. Learning Skills – The skills of Information and Communication, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Personal and Workplace Productivity Skills and proficiency in the use of Technology Tools. Learning skills enable students to acquire new content, knowledge, and skills,
connect new information to existing knowledge, learn new software programs, and learn new ways of doing things using technology tools.

BJ. Local School Improvement Council (LSIC) – A local advisory group composed of three teachers, three parents, two service employees, the principal, two at large members appointed by the principal, and one student from a school enrolling students in grade 7 or higher. The LSIC focuses on improving the education program and operation of the school; has authorization to request waivers of local or state rules, policies and state superintendent interpretations; assists in the development of the Five-Year School Strategic Plan and can apply for grants and awards.

BK. Middle Level Education – The education program that transitions students from the early childhood program and into the adolescent education program by creating small learning communities of adults and students in which stable and mutually respectful relationships

support all students’ intellectual, ethical, and social growth. Middle level education encompasses all curricular, co-curricular and extracurricular programs in grades 5-8.

BL. Modified Diploma – Formal documentation and recognition that an eligible student with disabilities, who is unable to meet the graduation requirements for a standard diploma, has met the modified diploma requirements specified on the student’s Individualized Education Program (hereinafter IEP). All students who meet the criteria for the Alternate Performance Task Assessment (hereinafter APTA) are presumed to be pursuing a modified diploma.

BM. More Rigorous Course – A course within the same content area in which the rigor and expectations are higher than the course for which the substitution is being made (e.g., Chemistry in lieu of Conceptual Chemistry).

BN. Multicultural Education – A program that fosters an attitude of understanding and acceptance of individuals from a variety of cultural, ethnic, racial and religious backgrounds.

BO. Objective – A step or component that describes grade level or course expectations for a content standard.

BP. Pathway – Designation of a student’s intended postsecondary goal within the individualized student transition plan and the level and sequence of courses needed to achieve that goal. The two pathways are Professional (Baccalaureate Degree or above); and Skilled (Associate Degree, Postsecondary Certificate or 21st Century Industry Credential).

BQ. Performance Descriptors – Narrative descriptions of how well students achieve success on the content standards and objectives. West Virginia has designated five performance levels: distinguished, above mastery, mastery, partial mastery and novice. Performance descriptors depict student achievement at each of those five levels for each content standard at each grade level or course for which performance descriptors have been developed.

BR. Performance Levels – Levels of student mastery of the content standards and objectives. The levels are “Novice,” “Partial Mastery,” “Mastery,” “Above Mastery” and “Distinguished.” Performance descriptors for each of these five levels are available for at least the core academic subjects.

BS. Performance Standards – A system of describing and categorizing student achievement which has four basic components: levels of performance; performance descriptors; cut scores from statewide assessments that set parameters for the designation of levels of performance; and exemplars of student work for each performance level. West Virginia has designated five performance levels: distinguished, above mastery, mastery, partial mastery and novice.

BT. Pre-kindergarten (pre-k) – The education program for all four-year-old children and three-year-old children with identified special needs that addresses the growth and development of children in the areas of social/emotional growth, the arts, physical health, language and literacy, mathematics, social studies and science. West Virginia’s pre-k is a readiness system designed to promote the success of children in kindergarten and lifelong learning.

BU. Proficient – Student performance at mastery level or above. The term is used in the accountability system to designate students who are at an acceptable level of performance on the statewide assessment.

BV. Program of Study – The selection of courses, that when delivered effectively, enables students to master the knowledge and skills needed to succeed in their chosen clusters and concentrations and leads to success in the global workplace and post-secondary education.

BW. Programmatic Level – A component of the pre-k-adult educational spectrum that addresses the developmental needs of one age group of students. Programmatic levels described in this document include Early Childhood Education (grades pre-k-4), Middle Level Education (grades 5-8), Adolescent Education (grades 9-12) and Adult Education.

BX. Reinventing Education Web Site – A web site or service that provides a broad array of educational resources including juried and other lesson plans aligned with content
standards, research and best practice information, web pages for teachers, professional development, instructional assistance and links to other educational sites.

BY. Required Courses – Those courses that all students must complete.

BZ. School Day – The time, inclusive of the instructional day, homeroom, class changes, breaks/recess, lunch, and other non-instructional activities from the first designated assembling of the student body in groups (homeroom or first period) to the dismissal of the student body.

CA. School Improvement – A continuous process to increase student achievement and positively affect other student outcomes. School improvement builds the capacity of all entities, both state and local, to improve student success.

CB. School Leadership Team B – A group of school representatives who are responsible for analyzing all facets of a school’s operation and making recommendations for improving student performance in the school. The school leadership team members are appointed by the principal and may include representatives from the Curriculum Team, Faculty Senate, Technology Team, and/or LSIC.

CC. Semester – A block of instructional time that is equivalent to at least one-half of the school year. For example, 90 instructional days are equal to a semester in a traditional school term of 180 instructional days.

CD. Senior Project – An integrated culminating project related to the student’s program of study which requires knowledge, skills, and concepts from the student’s total school experience. A quality senior project should be comprised of a research paper, a product, a portfolio and a presentation.

CE. Student Assistance Team – A trained school-based team which provides a formalized process for the review of student needs and complements the work of instruction and intervention teams.

CF. Technology Integration – The use of technology throughout content areas to help students master the 21st Century CSOs and Policy 2520.14 developing skills for lifelong learning.

CG. Technology Plan – The county board of education must ensure that the schools and county develops and update school and county technology plans as an integral component of the Five-Year School and School System Strategic Plan. The strategic planning process should ensure that technology is utilized throughout all programs of study and that the implementation meets other state and federal technology requirements.

CH. Technology Tools – Important 21st century technology tools include information and communication technologies such as computers, networking and other technologies (e.g., probes/sensors and accelerometers, MP3 players, interactive white boards); audio, video, multimedia and other digital tools; access to online learning communities and resources;
and aligned digital content software and adequate hardware for all students. Technology
tools, when integrated in with classroom instruction, enable students to access, manage, integrate and evaluate information across content areas, construct new knowledge and communicate efficiently with others.

CI. Unit of Credit – Recognition given to a student for the successful demonstration of mastery of the 21st century content standards and objectives at a level established for an approved required or elective high school level course consistent with this policy and W. Va. 126CSR44A 126CSR44O, WVBE Policies 2520.1-2520.15, the series that contains 21st century CSOs for West Virginia schools. Partial credit (2 units) may also be awarded. The level of mastery shall be in compliance with 126CSR37, WVBE Policy 2515, Uniform Grading (hereinafter Policy 2515). Individual students who demonstrate mastery of the 21st century CSOs of a particular course must be provided opportunities to progress to the next level. Credit shall also be granted for documented mastery of high school course requirements by a student prior to grade 9 and for successful completion of a dual credit course.

CJ. Virtual School – An alternative delivery system for course content. The West Virginia Virtual School was created within the WVDE by the Legislature to provide a variety of high quality, technologically delivered courses for pre-k-12 public school students. The Virtual School initiative helps bridge the barriers of time, distance and inequities for all West Virginia students by providing access to resources. The Virtual School offers required courses, Advanced Placement courses and a variety of elective, enrichment, remediation and Information Technology courses.

CK. West Virginia Measures of Academic Progress – The comprehensive assessment system for West Virginia that measures student performance. These measures include the WESTEST, EOC exams, Alternate Performance Task Assessment, Writing Assessment, ACT, EXPLORE, ACT PLAN, ACT Workkeys®, and NAEP.

CL. West Virginia Report Card – Information provided to parents and the general public on the quality of education in the public schools that is uniform and comparable among schools within and among the various school districts as defined in W. Va. Code §18-2E-4.

CM. West Virginia Standards for 21st Century Learning – The approved 21st century CSOs and Policy 2520.14.

CN. Work Day – Time allocated for the instructional day and other activities such as homeroom, class changes, lunch, planning periods, and staff development that may not exceed eight clock hours.

CO. Writing Across the Curriculum – Writing instruction and practice that is applied throughout all content areas.

CP. West Virginia Earn a Degree – Graduate Early (WV EDGE) BA program that allows students to take high school courses for community and technical college credit. WV EDGE courses are based on an alignment between the content standards and objectives of WVDE
approved courses and the syllabi of community and technical college courses. Students enrolled in high school courses approved for WV EDGE earn credit by passing a qualifying exam. The ultimate goal of the WV EDGE program is to allow a student to earn an associate degree concurrently with earning a high school diploma.

Adopted: November 14, 2011

Revised: July 23, 2012

Reference: W. Va. Constitution, Article XII, §2 , W. Va. Code §§18-1-1 and 4; 18-2-5 and 6; 18-2-7a: 18-2E-4, 5, 7, and 8; 18-5A-4; 18A-1-1; and Public Law 107-110, No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, WVDE Policy 2510